Show girls are re-united

By Alana Christensen on October 03, 2017
  • Show girls are re-united

    Miss Show Girl Reunion at the 2017 Royal Melbourne Show.

  • Show girls are re-united

    Miss Show Girl Reunion at the 2017 Royal Melbourne Show(Back L to R) Miss Benalla 1970 winner Cheryl Bottomley (nee Bulleid) alongside Miss Great Southern 1958, Judith Fasoli (nee Pearson), Heather Hargreaves (nee Moresi) who was announced as Miss Boort in 1960, and Miss Pyramid Hill 1974, Loren McRobb (nee James).

  • Show girls are re-united

    Miss Show Girl Reunion at the 2017 Royal Melbourne Show(L-R) Mother-daughter duo Miss Echuca 1960, Judy Hipwell (nee Walker), and her daughter and Miss Northern 1992 winner Fiona Crichton (nee had plenty to discuss with Miss Cohuna and Miss Northern District 1972 winner Kathryn Fitzsimons (nee Maloney), and Miss Cohuna 1963 Pauline Weeks (nee Phyland).

  • Show girls are re-united

    After striking up conversation at the event, Miss Yarrawonga and Miss Murray Valley 1981 Debra Mortimore (left) and Miss Swan Hill 1981 Glenda Stayner (nee Cox) released they'd met before at the Melbourne final. Both women competed for the 1981 title, with Mrs Stayner ultimately announced as the runner-up.

  • Show girls are re-united

    Miss Bunyip 1966 Roslyn Andrews (nee Drayton) caught up with 1990 Miss Sun Showgirl winner Elizabeth Porter.

  • Show girls are re-united

    Miss Deniliquin 1961 Frances Woolnough (nee Murphy) with Miss Echuca 1961 Kay Wearne (nee Yeaman) and Miss Euroa 1960 Judy Morrison (nee Blake).

From Benalla to Cohuna, and Maffra to Lilydale, dozens of women descended on the Royal Melbourne Show on Friday to celebrate 60 years since the beginning of the Miss Showgirl event.

With winners from the event’s inception in 1957, to modern winners who were awarded the Miss Showgirl title in 1996, it was a look back at the history of an event that holds fond memories for many.

Heritage curator Annette Shiell said the competition was a key attraction at the show throughout its 39 years.

‘‘It touched the lives of so many, many people. It was so significant and its importance to the Royal Agriculture Society of Victoria cannot be underestimated,’’ Dr Shiell said.

‘‘Each woman has such wonderful stories to tell and we’re so glad to be able to share those stories.’’

■Thank you to all the former Miss Showgirls who have shared their stories with us at Country News. We hope you enjoyed reading the stories each week as much as we enjoyed writing them.

By Alana Christensen on October 03, 2017

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