Livestock

Swine fever export arrangement with Singapore

By Jamie Salter

A pre-emptive zoning arrangement will facilitate Australian pig meat exports to Singapore in the event of an African swine fever outbreak.

Federal Agriculture Minister David Littleproud said the arrangement would improve certainty for the pig meat sector.

“Singapore is Australia’s single largest export market for pig meat with exports of over $60 million in 2019-20 and I express my gratitude to the Singaporean government for agreeing to these arrangements,” Mr Littleproud said.

“The Federal Government remains committed to keeping Australia’s $60 billion agricultural sector free of biosecurity threats, including ASF.

“Just last week two men had their visas cancelled after attempting to bring in nearly 5 kg of pork and pork products, seriously breaching Australia’s biosecurity laws.”

Mr Littleproud said African swine fever could have a significant impact on Australian pig production and contribute to wider economic impacts caused by a loss of access to overseas markets.

“The zoning arrangement is comprehensive and covers a range of potential scenarios to minimise trade disruption in the event of an ASF outbreak in Australia, including ensuring exports can continue from non-affected states or territories if the disease is detected in domestic pigs,” Mr Littleproud said.

The zoning arrangement is funded through the Federal Government’s $66.6 million ASF Response Package which has provided airports and mail centres with more biosecurity officers, detector dogs and X-ray machines.

Australian Pork Limited chief executive officer Margo Andrae said the Australian pork industry welcomed the announcement.

“We extend our thanks to the Australian and Singaporean governments for concluding this important arrangement, which will help maintain the flow of Australian pork exports to Singapore in the event of an outbreak,” Ms Andrae said.

“This is an important win for Singaporean consumers as well as for Aussie pig farmers, who now have greater certainty of access to export markets.

“Continued, conditional access to overseas markets could help limit the commercial impact of an ASF outbreak in Australia.”

● For more information about the current ASF measures visit: www.agriculture.gov.au/pestsdiseases-weeds/animal/asf