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Delta is happier than a pig in mud on Numurkah farm

By Rodney Woods

While this page is exclusively for dogs, sometimes you have to stretch the rules — especially when a pig acts like man's best friend among her many personalities. Delta is owned by Numurkah hobby farmer and Strathmerton Primary School teacher Tania Broadwood. Delta enjoys spending time with the horses as well as terriers Lucy and Tippy but she's not much of a fan of the old kelpie.

What are the personalities like of the two dogs and Delta?

Lucy is like a two-year-old on Coca-Cola or sugar. She's a lovely little dog but there's not much happening behind those eyes. She wants to be in everything and she's friendly. When we got her from the pound, they said she was timid but it must have been the environment she was in because she’s not timid.

Tippy is like an old reserved man. He has humans that he likes but other than that he stays his distance.

Delta doesn’t know she’s a pig. She thinks she's a cow, horse or dog but definitely not a pig. She likes to sleep a lot and she also follows the motorbike or is occasionally seen chasing the tractor.

Are there any stories you can tell us about Delta?

She goes visiting the neighbours. The neighbours on the north side have had to bring her back and the neighbours further up have had to call me to pick her up.

When we first got her she got a fright and took off. We had to go looking for her with a spotlight. After a while we could see where she was because the young stock were chasing her. She was so small we couldn't see her from a distance and we got help to corral her.

She went wandering one other time. It was the first frosty winter night one year and she went and slept under one of Mick Hogan’s diggers (at Nurmurkah business Mick Hogan Excavations and Polyirrigation).

The poor operator booted it (the digger) up the next morning and frightened her and then he was on the tracks of the digger thinking she was a wild pig. Then Doug Williams, another worker at the business, knew she was our pet and fed her apples until I came to take her home.

What would you do without her?

I’d have a lot more money but it would be very lonely. Plus, I wouldn’t have stories to tell to the kids at school.